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Is Trust the Most Important Asset in Your Workplace?

We all know how important trust is in relationships, both in the workplace and in in our personal lives. But as business leaders, are we continuously building, nourishing and preserving this valuable commodity? Do we consider it an indispensable component of the culture of our business?

Unfortunately, many business leaders do not recognize the importance of trust. That is why it’s rare to see customers become “raving fans” who would otherwise come back to us time and time again. We see employees leave their jobs because their leaders are not trustworthy. We see conflict within work teams, all because of this fundamental lack of trust.

How can I promote trust in my business?

Fortunately, any person or business leader can build a culture of trust if they have the right intentions and exercise a firm commitment to carrying out their promises.

A picture of a great company culture is one in which relationships are built on clear commitments made and kept. This Forbes article by David Williams (“The Most Valuable Business Commodity: Trust”) focuses in on the 5 major questions business leaders should ask themselves while pursuing this culture of trust.

  1. Commitment. Are team members committed to keeping their obligations?
  2. Accountability. Do employees hold their peers accountable for their commitments?
  3. Circumstances. What should leaders do when circumstances cause people to fail to keep their commitments?
  4. Promises. Do team members consider promises to customers as important as promises to their peers?
  5. Forgiveness. Is everyone at your organization willing to forgive themselves and one another?

What is the current level of trust in your company? Have the courage to find out. The experts at Business Consulting of NH can assist you with our experience, objectivity, and unbiased approach. Once you have identified the areas of distrust in your company and have raised everyone’s awareness, take prompt corrective action! We’re here to help you along the path to workplace harmony and trust. Call us at 603-763-9770 or contact us online today.

Finding Happiness and Fulfillment at Work

We all want to live happy and fulfilling lives, and we want our loved ones to be happy too. Happiness matters to all of us. We want to be happy and feel good all the time, and we want to go on feeling that way. Since most of us spend the largest part of our time working, we need to focus on finding happiness and fulfillment at work.

There are many things that contribute to finding happiness during our work-hours. Some things are internal and others are external, or related to the job we do and the environment at our work.

So what contributes to happiness in the workplace? What detracts from that happiness? We’ll start with what matters to us at work:

1. Are you in the right job?

Are you doing tasks that are enjoyable to you? Do you find satisfaction in what you do? We all need jobs that fit our personalities, and mesh with what drives us to excel. Many of us enter the workforce having no clue about what we want to do or what might fulfill us.

We ask our parents, friends, professors, and they tell us what we “should” do. Parents are typically clear about what they want for us, but is that what we really want? Does it suit us, energize us, and bring out the best in us? There are many tools and processes available to help us decide who we are and what’s best for us.

2. Do you find meaning in your work?

Does the work you do add meaning to your life? Do you feel deeply connected to how the job benefits others and society as a whole? Does it fulfill your sense of purpose? The challenge here is that many of us do not know our Life Purpose and don’t know how to find it. For these people, life is like going on a road trip and not knowing where they want to end up.

3. Relationships with your boss and co-workers

How can a boss contribute to your happiness? By being positive and friendly.

  • Does your boss approach you with a positive attitude?
  • Are they clear with their instructions, advice and guidance?
  • Do they give you frequent feedback on how you’re doing?
  • Do they give you the right tools to do your job well?
  • Do they listen to you in a way that shows they really hear you and are interested in what you are saying?
  • Do they care about you not only as a worker, but as a person?
  • Do they act and speak in a trustworthy way, and follow through with what they say they will do?
  • Do they take care of your problems quickly?

How do your co-workers contribute to your happiness? By being there as our friends.

  • Are they interested in you as a person?
  • Do they want to help you and support you?
  • Are they open to your needs, and willing to listen to you?
  • Are they willing to grow with you, celebrate your wins, and console you when you’re down?

4. Find balance between work and personal life

In this ever racing world of ours, finding  an opportunity to reflect on whether our life is really bringing us joy and happiness can be a challenge. Work tends to occupy more and more of our attention, far beyond just the hours we spend at the workplace. Many of us never put down our electronic devices for an extended period. We review and answer business-related emails all throughout the day.

We take our mobile devices with us on vacation, staying “connected” throughout the whole time. This is NOT the way to relax and rejuvenate. We should set boundaries for ourselves and those we lead to assure that our life does not become so unbalanced that we lose effectiveness and creativity. Without boundaries, we compromise our relationships with our family and friends.

At Business Consulting of NH, we have expertise in coaching and training business leaders and employees in each of these areas, and we would love to contribute to your happiness in the workplace. Contact us online today, or give us a call at 603-763-9770.

The Benefits of Mentoring in a Work Environment

Mentoring is one person taking another by the hand and guiding them.

The mentor has experience, knowledge, and wisdom, and cares deeply about the mentee’s personal growth.

Mentoring happens in all walks of life, including in families, sports, education, and careers. In a business environment, mentoring ideally starts on the first day of a person’s employment. Usually, the mentor is someone other than the supervisor.

A mentor’s role usually includes the following:

  • Helping you, the mentee, understand and become familiar with the company culture, vision and mission.
  • Helping you understand the various people you will be interacting with
  • Answering any questions that that you have along the way
  • Familiarizing you with company policies
  • Helping you out when you are “stuck”
  • Listening to you openly and fully
  • Challenging you to think outside the box and come up with answers to problems
  • Helping you with attitude changes, if necessary
  • Building up your confidence
  • Helping you increase your performance and overcome hurdles

Mentors should meet with mentees on a regular basis.

Ideally, they should both meet once per week for at least an hour. Meeting over coffee or a meal can help to deepen the relationship. It also helps if management checks in with the mentors from time to time to gauge the results of the mentorship program and support a mentor who might face challenges with their mentee.

At BCNH. we support our clients by helping to set up a mentoring program that works for them. We help to coach current and future mentors in their important roles, guiding them into achieving the greatest amount of success. To learn more about our valuable mentor coaching services, contact us online or give us a call at 603 763-9770.

The stress we bring to work: NWRS, Non-work-related stress

businessconsultingnh:

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While last month we dealt with the major causes of stress at work, it’s also important to recognize which types of stresses we bring to work. “NWRS” involves personal stresses we carry, which then get magnified at work.

We can divide NWRS into three categories:

  1. External Stress originates from relationships with family and friends, our surroundings, personal business dealings with vendors, and many other areas of our personal lives.
  2. Internal Stress includes worries about finances, safety and security, and the ways in which we live our daily lives.
  3. An “out of balance” life. This happens when the various demands of our lives and the demands we place upon ourselves are not in Harmony. Instead, they are competing and fighting with each other.

Let’s examine the “out of balance” life. How much time and attention do we give our children, spouses, or elderly parents compared to how much time we spend on ourselves, that is, our self-care? Or, perhaps we find ourselves constantly “on,”  continuously multi-tasking and living in the vice-grip of technology like smart phones, iPads, TV, and radio.

Other sources of NWRS stress in our lives include our beliefs, opinions and old wounds that we have not learned how to heal from. Many of these stressors keep doing their work on a subconscious level, and we project them onto the people we interact with, both in our personal lives and at work.

Would you believe that many of my clients don’t think they bring their stresses and exhaustion to work? I often hear people say, “I’m very different at work than at home.” Well, it’s my firm belief that we are all “one” person. We may just be a little more careful at work about how we act and react, not letting our complaining and unattractive habits show up as much.

So what is a manager or business leader to do about the NWRS which employees bring to work?

Be aware of it, observe, communicate, listen, be compassionate. But above all, be fair and realistic. And, if need be, point people to the appropriate external resources to get the help they need.

Call me, Coach Hardy, at 603-763-9770 for more guidance, or visit my website.

The stress we bring to work: NWRS, Non-work-related stress

image

While last month we dealt with the major causes of stress at work, it’s also important to recognize which types of stresses we bring to work. “NWRS” involves personal stresses we carry, which then get magnified at work.

We can divide NWRS into three categories:

  1. External Stress originates from relationships with family and friends, our surroundings, personal business dealings with vendors, and many other areas of our personal lives.
  2. Internal Stress includes worries about finances, safety and security, and the ways in which we live our daily lives.
  3. An “out of balance” life. This happens when the various demands of our lives and the demands we place upon ourselves are not in Harmony. Instead, they are competing and fighting with each other.

Let’s examine the “out of balance” life. How much time and attention do we give our children, spouses, or elderly parents compared to how much time we spend on ourselves, that is, our self-care? Or, perhaps we find ourselves constantly “on,”  continuously multi-tasking and living in the vice-grip of technology like smart phones, iPads, TV, and radio.

Other sources of NWRS stress in our lives include our beliefs, opinions and old wounds that we have not learned how to heal from. Many of these stressors keep doing their work on a subconscious level, and we project them onto the people we interact with, both in our personal lives and at work.

Would you believe that many of my clients don’t think they bring their stresses and exhaustion to work? I often hear people say, “I’m very different at work than at home.” Well, it’s my firm belief that we are all “one” person. We may just be a little more careful at work about how we act and react, not letting our complaining and unattractive habits show up as much.

So what is a manager or business leader to do about the NWRS which employees bring to work?

Be aware of it, observe, communicate, listen, be compassionate. But above all, be fair and realistic. And, if need be, point people to the appropriate external resources to get the help they need.

Call me, Coach Hardy, at 603-763-9770 for more guidance, or visit my website.

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